All In!

Are you a better employee if you put in super long hours and spend most of your waking moments at the office?  Is this the best measure of your worth and your engagement?

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Photo by Petri R on Unsplash

One of my mentors early in my career was always the first in the office in the morning and the last to leave each night.  Worked EVERY Saturday and some Sundays.  This put incredible stress on me to try to work what would appear to be reasonable hours in comparison to this guy who was a freak and also my boss.  I lived about 45 minutes to an hour from the office depending on traffic which added additional stress to the equation. He was only 15 minutes to his house.  I was not adverse to putting in the hours (clarify salary position) but I always felt that it was never enough.  I came from an hourly tradesman position working outside and I worked nearly every Saturday in order to make up for rain days or short days.  I needed to get a full paycheck.  I had a family and bills.  I was conditioned to work the hours and “pay my dues” as folks like to call it.

Shortly after leaving the company I found out that my mentor was getting a divorce.  I’m sure there was a story to this with lots of moving parts but I know that his work hours were a big contributor to this outcome.  He was an absent husband and father.  He poured his entire life into his work and spent nearly all of his waking hours in the office.

After this event he abruptly changed his work hours.  Too late for his marriage, however, he began to work more normal hours and abandoned the “all in” appearance that had defined his past work history.

So what does “all in”  look like to you?

Are you judged in a large part by the hours that you put in?

Do you think hours are a true measure of your performance or engagement?

Can you be “all in” and still work normal work hours?

I’ve witnessed a variety of viewpoints on this subject.  Some folks use work hours to measure value, commitment and engagement to an organization.   It’s an easy measurement.  Either you are sitting at your desk or your not.  I had a report years ago who never showed up on Saturday and my boss was convinced that they were not engaged and lacked future value based on the lack of Saturday attendance.  I approached this employee and suggested that they begin to come in on Saturdays and make sure that they were seen by the boss in order to get “attendance credit”.  Almost immediately there was a change in attitude by the boss.  He felt that there was a big change when it was simply window dressing.

Then I have seen employees who lay down the law early and makes sure that everyone knows what comes first in their lives- family, kids, church, charity work, hobbies, etc.  It seems like they can get a pass if they make it clear early on and stand firm.  They can be successful in the organization and still leave at 5:01 every day.  In a very strange way it doesn’t seem fair- does it?

So what’s the point here?  I don’t believe you should rate your employees performance or engagement based on work hours.  Base your judgement on the production of quality work product- period.  If they are able to produce in standard work hours then be content and happy for them.  They will have a better life and work balance will make them a better employee in the long run.  Putting pressure on them to work longer hours and take on an unrealistic amount of work will eventually lead to burn out.  And probably an empty seat.  My instruction to employees who work a ridiculous amount of hours is:  GO HOME!  See your family.  Have fun.  Unwind and relax.

You are not a slave- you have a life.  The work will be there when you return.

What do you think?  Have you seen someone burn out due to crazy hours?  Do you think time at your desk is an accurate measure of worth?  Click on “leave a comment” and let me know what you think!  

 

Talker or Doer?

Are you a silver-tongued leader?

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I’ve met a bunch of people in leadership through the years.  Some were gifted motivators.  They knew how to communicate a goal and guide to the finish.  They had the ability to paint the picture.  A great gift to be able to help folks see the finish line.  Yet sometimes this was all you got.  A picture and a story.

Then I have met some great leaders who are really in it.  These are the folks that might say less but are next to you in the battle.  They realize that talk won’t always get you there.  They are willing to really help out.  Get dirty.  Get into the fight.

The rub lies in that the talker is often seen as the better leader.

I really hate this.  The talker uses his mouth.  The doer uses his hands.  But classic leadership will tell you that you don’t have the time to be a doer.  You shouldn’t get bogged down in actually doing the work.  If you’re a leader -you are worth more.  Your ability to motivate and direct is more important.

Messed up thinking!

While I agree that you should not get bogged down doing tasks that should be delegated, many leaders feel that it is below them to jump in and help out.  They are the boss.  It would make them look bad if they were seen actually doing the work.

I can’t be a used car salesman leader.  I personally have a hard time trusting and believing someone who talks too much and doesn’t really want to pitch in and help out.  I realize that there is value in motivating and directing yet by only using these two tools you are forgetting the most powerful tool.

Serving your team by actually working along side of them. 

Here is a question to ponder- What do YOU create?  Do you actually produce things as a leader or is your day filled with walking and talking?  Do you produce or do you talk?

My opinion- we need more doers and less talkers!  What do your think?  Let me know by clicking on “Leave a Comment” and let me hear your opinion.  Talker or Doer?

 

 

 

Fight The Urge!

I was invited to join a group of friends, just men, for a cookout tomorrow.  I have decided to go.  This sounds like an easy decision on the surface.  But really it’s not that easy.

My inclination would be to stay home and relax.  See, I’ve had a difficult few weeks at work.  Traveling, problem solving, frustrations.  It’s been a real basket full of junk.  I have plenty of really good excuses to skip out on this one.

But I know that I really need to be there.  Not because they need me to be there.  There will be plenty of guys that will attend.  No, the reason I need to be there is me.

My flesh is telling me that I deserve to stay home and relax.  But I know that I need to stay in community.  I need to stay connected.  I need to fight the urge to isolate.

Men are generally experts at isolation and coming up with excuses to be alone.  But this is unhealthy and dangerous.  The enemy loves a man in isolation.  He knows he’s got us right where he wants us.  A wise lady told me “Oh that devil, he’s been around for a long time.  He’s got a big bag of tricks.  He’s knows exactly what works on you.” I think we forget that fact.  We think we will be fine by ourselves.  Independent.  Self-reliant.  American individualism.

So off I will go.  I know I will enjoy the company.  I know that I will be glad that I went.  It will be good for me.  Better than sitting on the couch with a book which would be my first choice.

Sometimes you need to fight the urge.  The urge telling you that you deserve something.  The urge that tells you that you come first.  The urge that tells you that you it’s ok to be alone.

Deep down we know what we need.  What is pure.  What is good.  What will build up.

Relationships take work so fight the urge to isolate.  Reach out and connect.  Someone has to make the effort.  Why not you?

Do you struggle some times staying connected?  Click on comments and tell me what you think!